UC Davis College of Letters and Science

Suad Joseph Receives Service Award

December 04, 2019
Calling her an “institutional cornerstone,” the Middle East Studies Association of North America recently presented its annual Jere L. Bacharach Service Award to Distinguished Professor Suad Joseph. The award recognizes outstanding service to the association and the profession, and is named after the University of Washington historian who received the honor in 2004.

Unique Sled Dogs Helped the Inuit Thrive in the North American Arctic

December 04, 2019
Inuit sled dogs have changed little since people migrated with them to the North American Arctic across the Bering Strait from Siberia, according to UC Davis researchers and colleagues who have examined DNA from the dogs from that time span. The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.

2018 - Jodi Connelly

December 03, 2019

Jodi Connelly (M.F.A., art, '18)  has been awarded the first ever Ali Youssefi artist residency award. The award includes studio space and a solo exhibition (December 2019 - February 2020) at the Verge Center for the Arts in Sacramento and a monthly stipend.  Connelly’s work investigates the complexities of the human relationship to nature and the environment. Through site-specific environmental interventions that include photographic documentation, sculpture and drawing, she explores issues of climate change and the effects migration and development have had on native ecosystems. 

Statistics and Space: Three New AAAS Fellows

November 26, 2019
Three faculty members of the College of Letters and Science are among the 10 UC Davis faculty elected to the 2019 class of fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. The new fellows are Jiming Jiang, professor of statistics; Thomas C.M. Lee, professor of statistics; and Sarah Stewart, professor of earth and planetary sciences.

For These Design Students, the Campus is the Lab

November 26, 2019

For many students, research involves donning white coats, gloves and goggles and going into a lab. But for students in Advanced Interior Architecture, the entire UC Davis campus is their lab.

When Viral Messages Pose Health Threats

Like a disease detective, Jade (Jieyu) Ding Featherstone is on the hunt for a rising global threat to public health. But her territory is Twitter and her target is vaccine misinformation.

For her doctoral research in the Department of Communication, Featherstone is tracking anti-vaccination tweets. Among questions she is exploring: Are there central players behind them? If so, are they bots or humans? Who retweets anti-vaxx messages? What works best in countering their false claims? 

Artist Incubator

Major takes students from studio to practice.

One of the toughest courses Shawn Sullivan ever took at UC Davis was an art class with Professor Lucy Puls.

Classes That Cast a Spell

Between 1560 and 1660, about 60,000 people in Europe were executed for witchcraft. About 80% were women.

What caused the massive witch hunts of the 16th and 17th centuries? Why did most of the witch hunts take place in Germany and Switzerland? And why were women most often accused of witchcraft? Why did the witch hunts end?

Student's Art Reflects Climate Change Concerns

Walking around campus, you see sunlight unexpectedly reflect off an oak tree. A ginkgo tree appears to have a viewing port that lets you see straight through it. Your face appears in the bark of a magnolia.

Art and psychology student Maxine Aiello, “overwhelmed and scared” by climate change, created “If Trees Could Talk” for the art class “Miniature and the Gigantic,” taught by Professor Robin Hill.

Deploying Bots to Thwart Trafficking and Domestic Violence

November 14, 2019

If  you buy a pair of shoes online, you’ll be bombarded by companies wanting to sell you shoes. What if the algorithms that target purchasing priorities could be used for a greater good?

That’s just what Raquelmarie Clark (B.A., communication, ’18) looked into for her undergraduate research project, “Algorithmic Governance: Worrisome or Wonderful?” Clark has since founded We Always Help Each Other (WAHEO), a nonprofit that supports organizations serving victims of sex trafficking, domestic violence, and sexual assault.