U.S. History

Forum Explores Context, Consequences of Capitol Insurrection

A year ago on Jan. 6, supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. What is the historical context of the attack and what does it mean for the future of the nation? Four UC Davis historians will discuss the insurrection and its implications for the midterm congressional elections at an online forum on Tuesday, Jan. 11, from 3:10 to 4:30 p.m. PST.

Middle East Historian Awarded NEH Fellowship

Arab textile workers in North and South America will be focus of new book.

UC Davis historian Stacy Fahrenthold — author of an award-winning book on the activism of Arab immigrants during World War I — has received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to write a global history of the Syrian working class.

Podcast Debut Focuses on Conspiracy Theories

On the first episode of "The Backdrop," a UC Davis podcast exploring the world of ideas, historian Kathryn Olmsted discusses her work studying the history and impact of conspiracy theories on American society and politics. She also offers advice on how people can avoid falling prey to them.

Historian's Podcasts Examine Conspiracy Theories

Delve into popular conspiracy theories this month with a new podcast from Kathryn Olmsted, professor of history in the UC Davis College of Letters and Science. Olmsted has launched a four-episode “State of Conspiracy” series on the site Crooked Media.

Women Tell Women’s History in Oxford Handbook

Ellen Hartigan-O’Connor and Lisa Materson, collaborators in research and teaching of women’s and gender history at UC Davis for 10 years, were keenly aware of many fascinating stories about women in history, as uncovered by female historians. But getting those stories into the big narratives of history was more than one or two people could accomplish. Then Oxford University Press asked the scholars, both associate professors of history in the College of Letters and Science, to create a women’s history handbook.

Historian's Impact: A New National Monument

Historian Gregory Downs has devoted much of his career to setting the record straight on Reconstruction. He says a new national park will go farther than any of his scholarly publications in reversing a public amnesia about " “the most misunderstood period in U.S. history.”