geology

New Clues to Deep Earthquake Mystery

May 27, 2020
A new understanding of our planet’s deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth.

Arizona Meteorite Points to Source of LL Chondrites

April 27, 2020

The 2016 Dishchii’bikoh meteorite fall in the White Mountain Apache reservation in central Arizona has given scientists a big clue to finding out where so-called LL chondrites call home. 

New Leak Detector for Earth’s Core

April 10, 2020
Earth’s molten core may be leaking iron, according to researchers who analyzed how iron behaves inside our planet.

Managing Resources in a Water-Limited World

March 06, 2020
An interdisciplinary team from UC Davis is collaborating with the IHE Delft Institute for Water Education—the largest graduate water education facility in the world, based in the Netherlands—to develop a summer school on “Sustainable Water Management in a Water-Limited World.”

Explaining the Tiger Stripes of Enceladus

December 09, 2019
Saturn’s tiny, frozen moon Enceladus is a strange place. Just 300 miles across, the moon is thought to have an outer shell of ice covering a global ocean 20 miles deep, encasing a rocky core. Slashed across Enceladus’ south pole are four straight, parallel fissures or “tiger stripes” from which water erupts. These fissures aren’t quite like anything else in the solar system. 

Mutant Fern Spores Point to Mass Extinction Culprit

October 24, 2019
About 200 million years ago, much of the life on Earth was wiped out in the end-Triassic mass extinction. The catastrophe may have been caused by climate change related to massive volcanic eruptions.

Four Limbs Good, Three Legs Bad?

October 01, 2019
If “Why?” is the first question in science, “Why not?” must be a close second. Sometimes it’s worth thinking about why something does not exist. Such as a truly three-legged animal.

Pockets of Primordial Earth Still Remain

September 18, 2019
New research suggests specific giant rock regions in the mantle have existed for 4.5 billion years, since Earth’s beginning.

A Double Major for Digging Up Dinosaurs

Colin Boisvert always wanted to be a paleontologist. A double major in geology and biology will give him a solid foundation in science so he can pursue his dream of becoming a professor, he said. “A double major really helps give me the broadest background possible.”

Understanding How Pressures in Planets Evolve

September 04, 2019

A new study from Caltech and the UC Davis College of Letters and Science shows that giant impacts can dramatically lower the internal pressure of planets, a finding that could significantly change the current model of planetary formation.