Society and Culture

Sophia’s Story: Reclaiming an Orphan From an ‘Indian School’

Lauren Peters, a UC Davis Native American studies doctoral student, and her family recently returned the remains of their grandmother's aunt, Sophia Tetoff, to her native Aleut island in Alaska. In 1896 the 12-year-old orphan was sent to an Indian school in Pennsylvania where she died five years later and was buried. The Peterses are among the hundreds of Native families retrieving their ancestors from school cemeteries in the United States and Canada. They are believed to be the first to return a Native child to Alaska.

LGBTQ+ Youth Face Increased Anxiety Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

While a life-altering pandemic has caused a substantial uptick in anxiety and depression symptoms among adults and children alike, LGBTQ+ youth have turned to peers in anonymous online discussion forums for support. New research from UC Davis suggests these LGBTQ+ teenagers — who already experience disproportionate levels of psychological adversity — exhibited increased anxiety on the popular r/LGBTeens subreddit throughout 2020 and the start of 2021.

How Is the Economy Doing Post-Pandemic?

The economy is rapidly growing coming out of the pandemic, but prices are rising and supply chains are fragile. Are these just glitches, or are the changes here to stay? UC Davis LIVE held a conversation, hosted by Soterios Johnson, on the future of the U.S. economy following the pandemic. Òscar Jordà and Marianne Bitler, professors in the Department of Economics, focused on the current state of the U.S. economy, short- and long-term changes to look out for, and whether we would be anxious or confident about our economic future. The show was livestreamed July 1.

Graduate Student Symposium Celebrates Indigenous Scholarship Around the Globe

To celebrate and connect Indigenous activist-researchers across the hemisphere, UC Davis Department of Native American Studies graduate students are holding their ninth annual research symposium April 26-29. The theme this year is “From Red Power to Wallmapu Libre and Land Back” and the event will feature a lineup of Indigenous scholars and activists, as well as 25 graduate student researchers from UC Davis and beyond who represent a multitude of disciplines and collaborate with numerous Indigenous communities.

Award-Winning Shakespearean Scholar to Give Lunn Lecture

Stephen Greenblatt, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Harvard University humanities professor, will give an online lecture Tuesday, May 4, on “Shakespeare’s Second Chance.” This year’s Eugene Lunn Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the UC Davis Department of History, will begin at 4 p.m. PDT, with a Q&A session to follow.

UC Davis Expands Study of South Asian Religions With Jainism

Although Jainism is one of the world’s oldest religions and continues to have significant influence globally, it isn’t widely known. Thanks to a $1.5 million gift from longtime UC Davis supporter Mohini Jain and the recent hire of Assistant Professor Lynna Dhanani in the Department of Religious Studies, UC Davis is helping to increase the visibility of Jainism through research, academic and public programming, and course offerings.

Most Teen Bullying Occurs Among Peers Climbing the Social Ladder

Teens who bully, harass, or otherwise victimize their peers are not always lashing out in reaction to psychological problems or unhealthy home environments, but are often using aggression strategically to climb their school’s social hierarchy, a UC Davis study suggests. These findings point to the reasons why most anti-bullying programs don’t work and suggest possible strategies for the future.