Society and Culture

In Memoriam: Ed Costantini

Political scientist Edmond Costantini traced his keen interest in politics and current events to a decade he spent as a youth delivering newspapers in Manhattan in New York, where his customers included future President Dwight D. Eisenhower and activist Eugene Debs. Costantini, who died Jan. 10 in Davis at age 89, would later become a sought-after news source himself for his expertise on California elections and politics.

Forum Explores Context, Consequences of Capitol Insurrection

A year ago on Jan. 6, supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. What is the historical context of the attack and what does it mean for the future of the nation? Four UC Davis historians will discuss the insurrection and its implications for the midterm congressional elections at an online forum on Tuesday, Jan. 11, from 3:10 to 4:30 p.m. PST.

How Has DACA Improved Birth Outcomes Among Mexican Immigrant Mothers?

Undocumented pregnant immigrant mothers and their newborn children often experience health difficulties because of the looming threat and fear of deportation. UC Davis sociologists looked at DACA’s positive impact on birth outcomes among a portion of Mexican-immigrant women in the United States. “We found that DACA was associated with improvements in the rates of low birth weight and very low birth weight, birth weight in grams, and gestational age among infants born to Mexican-immigrant mothers," they write in a new policy brief released by the UC Davis Center for Poverty and Inequality Research.

Denisovans or Homo Sapiens: Who Were the First to Settle (Permanently) on the Tibetan Plateau?

The Tibetan Plateau has long been considered one of the last places to be populated by people in their migration around the globe. A new paper by archaeologists at UC Davis highlights that our extinct cousins, the Denisovans, reached the “roof of the world” about 160,000 years ago — 120,000 years earlier than previous estimates for our species — and even contributed to our adaptation to high altitude.

Inuit Foodways Connect Colleges and Continent

Connections that UC Davis scholars built across campus and continents have led to a $298,000 National Science Foundation award to engage with Inuit fermenters in Greenland and support them in identifying the challenges and opportunities for creating a resurgence in Inuit fermented foods. Their research is part of “Navigating the New Arctic,” one of NSF's 10 Big Ideas.

Uncovering the Yemeni American Experience

As a recipient of a Mellon Foundation/American Council of Learned Societies Public Fellows scholarship, UC Davis professor Sunaina Maira planned to explore how former President Donald Trump’s travel ban on people from Muslim-majority countries impacted Arab American communities in the San Francisco Bay Area. Then COVID-19 hit, requiring Maira to shift approach.

Communication Faculty Honored as Young Public Health Innovator

The American Public Health Association recently presented Jingwen Zhang, a UC Davis assistant professor of communication, with its 2021 Ayman El-Mohandes Young Professional Public Health Innovation Award. One of the association’s top awards, it recognizes a public health professional, age 40 or younger, who is using an innovative solution to address a complex public health issue.

Chancellor's 'Face to Face' Program Features Sociologist

This month’s guest on Chancellor Gary S. May’s Face to Face program is researching a topic of particular interest to the chancellor: the kind of place where he grew up. Orly Clerge, a UC Davis assistant professor of sociology, is studying how suburbs change when Black residents “infuse their identity, their politics, their economic rationales into the overall structure of these places.”

UC Davis to Host Mentoring Institute for Early Career Poverty Researchers

The UC Davis Center for Poverty and Inequality Research recently received a $353,421 federal grant to launch a program to help up-and-coming poverty scholars get their careers off to a strong start. The Early Career Mentoring Institute, which will run for one week each spring of 2022, 2024 and 2026, aims to nurture a diversity of scholars studying poverty and social mobility.