Latest News

In Memoriam: Ed Costantini

Political scientist Edmond Costantini traced his keen interest in politics and current events to a decade he spent as a youth delivering newspapers in Manhattan in New York, where his customers included future President Dwight D. Eisenhower and activist Eugene Debs. Costantini, who died Jan. 10 in Davis at age 89, would later become a sought-after news source himself for his expertise on California elections and politics.

Wayne Thiebaud’s Death Brings Outpouring of Tributes

Art professor emeritus Wayne Thiebaud's death at 101 on Dec. 25, 2021, brought an outpouring of memories and tributes, critical acclaim for the artist’s remarkable life and career, and news of a significant gift to UC Davis.

Lighting Research Center Opens in Mexico in Collaboration With UC Davis

A major milestone in a collaboration between the UC Davis California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and the Universidad Autonama de Guadalajara (UAG) was recently reached with the opening of a lighting technology and research center in Mexico.

The Centro de Tecnología en Iluminación (CTI) in Guadalajara will address growing climate change concerns through research and collaborations committed to developing clean energy and sustainability solutions across Mexico.

Early Career Accolade for Kyle Crabtree

Kyle Crabtree, associate professor of chemistry, has been recognized with the 2022 Early Career Award from the Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS). Crabtree has established a unique career at the intersection of molecular laboratory astrophysics, astronomical observations and astrochemical modeling, the AAS said in a statement. 

Virtual Tea Colloquium Will Address Ties Between Tea and Health

The UC Davis Global Tea Initiative’s seventh annual colloquium, titled “Tea and Beyond: Bridging Science and Culture, Time and Space,” will bring together scholars from around the globe presenting on topics such as tea and general health, anxiety, meditation, use of teas by Indigenous people and specific ethnic populations, and examining non-tea infusions that are often marketed as tea. Taking place Jan.

Forum Explores Context, Consequences of Capitol Insurrection

A year ago on Jan. 6, supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. What is the historical context of the attack and what does it mean for the future of the nation? Four UC Davis historians will discuss the insurrection and its implications for the midterm congressional elections at an online forum on Tuesday, Jan. 11, from 3:10 to 4:30 p.m. PST.

How Has DACA Improved Birth Outcomes Among Mexican Immigrant Mothers?

Undocumented pregnant immigrant mothers and their newborn children often experience health difficulties because of the looming threat and fear of deportation. UC Davis sociologists looked at DACA’s positive impact on birth outcomes among a portion of Mexican-immigrant women in the United States. “We found that DACA was associated with improvements in the rates of low birth weight and very low birth weight, birth weight in grams, and gestational age among infants born to Mexican-immigrant mothers," they write in a new policy brief released by the UC Davis Center for Poverty and Inequality Research.

Denisovans or Homo Sapiens: Who Were the First to Settle (Permanently) on the Tibetan Plateau?

The Tibetan Plateau has long been considered one of the last places to be populated by people in their migration around the globe. A new paper by archaeologists at UC Davis highlights that our extinct cousins, the Denisovans, reached the “roof of the world” about 160,000 years ago — 120,000 years earlier than previous estimates for our species — and even contributed to our adaptation to high altitude.

Professor Wins Human Rights Education Award

Keith David Watenpaugh, founder and director of Human Rights Studies at UC Davis, has received the 2021 O’Brien Award for Human Rights Education. A leading historian of human rights, Watenpaugh has led important educational initiatives at UC Davis and collaborated with partners in the Middle East and beyond.

Inuit Foodways Connect Colleges and Continent

Connections that UC Davis scholars built across campus and continents have led to a $298,000 National Science Foundation award to engage with Inuit fermenters in Greenland and support them in identifying the challenges and opportunities for creating a resurgence in Inuit fermented foods. Their research is part of “Navigating the New Arctic,” one of NSF's 10 Big Ideas.