Science

Chemist, Psychologist and Physicist Named AAAS Fellows

Three faculty from the UC Davis College of Letters and Science are among 564 newly elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science announced Wednesday, Jan. 26. 

AAAS fellows are scientists, engineers and innovators who have been recognized for their achievements across disciplines ranging from research, teaching and technology, to administration in academia, industry and government, to excellence in communicating and interpreting science to the public.

The new fellows from the College of Letters and Science are:

Lighting Research Center Opens in Mexico in Collaboration With UC Davis

A major milestone in a collaboration between the UC Davis California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and the Universidad Autonama de Guadalajara (UAG) was recently reached with the opening of a lighting technology and research center in Mexico.

The Centro de Tecnología en Iluminación (CTI) in Guadalajara will address growing climate change concerns through research and collaborations committed to developing clean energy and sustainability solutions across Mexico.

Early Career Accolade for Kyle Crabtree

Kyle Crabtree, associate professor of chemistry, has been recognized with the 2022 Early Career Award from the Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS). Crabtree has established a unique career at the intersection of molecular laboratory astrophysics, astronomical observations and astrochemical modeling, the AAS said in a statement. 

Virtual Tea Colloquium Will Address Ties Between Tea and Health

The UC Davis Global Tea Initiative’s seventh annual colloquium, titled “Tea and Beyond: Bridging Science and Culture, Time and Space,” will bring together scholars from around the globe presenting on topics such as tea and general health, anxiety, meditation, use of teas by Indigenous people and specific ethnic populations, and examining non-tea infusions that are often marketed as tea. Taking place Jan.

Denisovans or Homo Sapiens: Who Were the First to Settle (Permanently) on the Tibetan Plateau?

The Tibetan Plateau has long been considered one of the last places to be populated by people in their migration around the globe. A new paper by archaeologists at UC Davis highlights that our extinct cousins, the Denisovans, reached the “roof of the world” about 160,000 years ago — 120,000 years earlier than previous estimates for our species — and even contributed to our adaptation to high altitude.

Geobiologist David Gold Wins NSF Career Award

David Gold, assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, has received a CAREER grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to investigate biomarkers for identifying the oldest animal fossils on Earth.

How Bacteria Makes Copper Into Antibiotics

Copper in small quantities is an essential nutrient but can also be toxic. Human immune cells use copper to fight invading pathogens. Some microorganisms, in turn, have evolved ways to take up copper and incorporate it into biological molecules, either as a way to absorb copper for nutrition or to neutralize its toxic effects.

Communication Faculty Honored as Young Public Health Innovator

The American Public Health Association recently presented Jingwen Zhang, a UC Davis assistant professor of communication, with its 2021 Ayman El-Mohandes Young Professional Public Health Innovation Award. One of the association’s top awards, it recognizes a public health professional, age 40 or younger, who is using an innovative solution to address a complex public health issue.