Science

Meteorites Show Transport of Material in Early Solar System

September 08, 2020

New studies of a rare type of meteorite show that material from close to the sun reached the outer solar system even as the planet Jupiter cleared a gap in the disk of dust and gas from which the planets formed. The results, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, add to an emerging understanding of how our solar system formed and how planets form around other stars.

Ichthyosaur’s Last Meal is Evidence of Triassic Megapredation

August 19, 2020

Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal. The fossil, discovered in 2010 in southwestern China, is described in a paper published Aug. 20 in the journal iScience.

David Olson Receives Neurochemistry Award

August 10, 2020

Assistant Professor David Olson has received the American Society for Neurochemistry’s Jordi Folch-Pi Memorial Award. The award is given to an outstanding young investigator who has demonstrated a high level of research competence and originality, has significantly advanced our knowledge of neurochemistry, and shows a high degree of potential for future accomplishments.

Newly Formed Center to Study Principles That Affect Planetary Bodies

August 10, 2020
University of California, Davis, will be part of a new National Science Foundation Physics Frontier Center focusing on understanding the physics and astrophysical implications of matter under pressures so high that the structure of individual atoms is disrupted.

Brain Builds and Uses Maps of Social Networks, Physical Space, in the Same Way

July 22, 2020

Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, co-workers, and how they relate to each other. New research from the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain shows that we put together this social map in much the same way that we assemble a map of physical places and things.

Insight Into Toddlers’ Awareness of Their Own Uncertainty

July 21, 2020

Toddlers may not be able to describe their feelings of uncertainty, but a new study from the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis provides evidence that toddlers may experience and deal with uncertainty in decision-making in the same way as older children and adults.

New Clues to Deep Earthquake Mystery

May 27, 2020
A new understanding of our planet’s deepest earthquakes could help unravel one of the most mysterious geophysical processes on Earth.

Two Faculty Honored for Contributions to Science of Psychology

January 31, 2020
Two faculty in the Department of Psychology — Professor Paul Hastings and Associate Professor Eliza Bliss-Moreau — have been named fellows of the Association for Psychological Science (APS). Hastings and Bliss-Moreau are among 51 psychologists in the newest class of APS fellows, selected for “sustained outstanding contributions to the science of psychology in the areas of research, teaching, service, and/or application.”

Can You Change Your Personality? Scientists Say ‘Maybe’

December 12, 2019
It has long been believed that people can’t change their personalities, which are largely stable and inherited. But a review of recent research in personality science points to the possibility that personality traits can change through persistent intervention and major life events.

Explaining the Tiger Stripes of Enceladus

December 09, 2019
Saturn’s tiny, frozen moon Enceladus is a strange place. Just 300 miles across, the moon is thought to have an outer shell of ice covering a global ocean 20 miles deep, encasing a rocky core. Slashed across Enceladus’ south pole are four straight, parallel fissures or “tiger stripes” from which water erupts. These fissures aren’t quite like anything else in the solar system. 

Unique Sled Dogs Helped the Inuit Thrive in the North American Arctic

December 04, 2019
Inuit sled dogs have changed little since people migrated with them to the North American Arctic across the Bering Strait from Siberia, according to UC Davis researchers and colleagues who have examined DNA from the dogs from that time span. The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.

$3.75M to Explore Synthetic Diamond Semiconductors at Crocker Lab

November 26, 2019

Although diamonds are mostly thought of as jewelry, synthetic diamonds are being explored for semiconductors because of their unique properties. Structurally identical to diamonds, synthetic diamonds are produced by a controlled process, as compared to natural diamonds, which are created by geologic processes.