Society and Culture Blog Posts

Recreating Nature’s Machinery for Making Hydrogen Gas

December 04, 2019

Research from the University of Illinois and UC Davis has chemists one step closer to recreating nature’s most efficient machinery for generating hydrogen gas. This new development may help clear the path for the hydrogen fuel industry to move into a larger role in the global push toward more environmentally friendly energy sources. The researchers reported their findings Oct. 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Alameda Creek Project Gets $31.4 million

October 16, 2019
Work to restore the natural flow of Alameda Creek into the San Francisco Bay involving two design department faculty is moving forward with $31.4 million from the State of California.

History Professors Receive Graduate Mentoring Fellowships

October 10, 2019

Three history professors are among the four recipients of this year's Wakeham Mentoring Fellowships from UC Davis. The honor is given to faculty and their mentees to support the exploration of mentoring best practices. Up to five $10,000 fellowships are awarded annually.

The 2019-2020 Wakeham Mentoring Fellowship recipients include:

Study Finds Deportations Haven't Reduced Crime

September 27, 2019
Economists' findings are part of multidisciplinary approach to studying immigration.

UC Davis researchers are examining the consequences of deportation from many angles — its effects on people, families and communities. Their research employs analytical methods from sociology, economics, the humanities and other disciplines.

Why Negative Campaigning Works — and How to Fight It

September 13, 2019
Our brains are hard-wired to remember insults and attacks — which explains why so many political campaigns go negative. Research by psychology professor Alison Ledgerwood also finds a bright side: You can train your brain to flip the script.

Historian's Podcasts Examine Conspiracy Theories

September 05, 2019
Delve into popular conspiracy theories this month with a new podcast from Kathryn Olmsted, professor of history in the UC Davis College of Letters and Science. Olmsted has launched a four-episode “State of Conspiracy” series on the site Crooked Media.

Faculty Fellowships Provide Freedom for Research

August 09, 2019

From the history of black women chefs to a documentary film on dwarfism to African music in Brazil, the UC Davis Humanities Institute’s new faculty research fellows will pursue a wide range of topics this year. The fellowship promotes interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, who will meet weekly to discuss their research and creative work.

Sociology Researcher Gets Grant for Police Shootings Study

August 02, 2019
Sociology doctoral candidate Matthew Thompson has received a $25,000 grant from the National Collaborative on Gun Violence Research to complete his dissertation on police shootings. Thompson’s research focuses on how the organizational structure of police agencies and their use-of-force policies influence their rates of officer-involved shootings.

Howard Chiang Wins Book Prize For 'After Eunuchs'

July 25, 2019
UC Davis historian Howard Chiang’s book on gender and sexuality in modern China has won the Humanities Book Prize from the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS).

From Chinese Film to Housing Segregation, Graduate Fellows Explore the World

July 23, 2019
This year's graduate fellows in the College of Letters and Science come from a wide range of majors and are using the fellowships to explore diverse topics. Graduate fellowships support students in humanities, arts, and cultural studies programs to engage in research or creative projects over the summer.

More Safety Net Programs Could Aid Escape from Deep Poverty

June 18, 2019

With assistance such as food stamps, tax credits and utility and housing discounts, more than two-thirds of those in “deep poverty” escape within a year, but nearly a quarter return to poverty at some point, half of those in five years. The findings point to the effectiveness and further need for safety net programs that provide a boost out of poverty.

Q&A: Psychology Alum/Professor on the Importance of Undergraduate Research

June 06, 2019
Jonathan Helm got his first taste of psychology research during his second year as a UC Davis undergraduate. After earning three UC Davis psychology degrees, Helm is now an assistant professor of quantitative psychology at San Diego State University. He recently collaborated with one of his former UC Davis professors on a study that found growing up in impoverished urban neighborhoods more than doubles your chances of developing a psychosis-spectrum disorder by middle adulthood. We asked him some questions about his journey from student to faculty researcher: