Blog

Innovative Detector Sees Its First Neutrinos

March 12, 2020
The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment at Fermilab, known as ANNIE, has seen its first neutrino events. (Neutrino events are interactions between neutrinos and water in the detector.) This milestone heralds the start of an ambitious program in neutrino physics and detector technology development. 

Managing Resources in a Water-Limited World

March 06, 2020
An interdisciplinary team from UC Davis is collaborating with the IHE Delft Institute for Water Education—the largest graduate water education facility in the world, based in the Netherlands—to develop a summer school on “Sustainable Water Management in a Water-Limited World.”

Code for Social Good

March 02, 2020
Held in January 2020, the UC Davis hackathon brought together more than 600 of the most talented students in California to develop apps that address the world's most pressing social issues. 

Analysis: Trump Supporters Have Little Trust in Societal Institutions

February 24, 2020
Research by a UC Davis communication professor and colleagues finds that research shows that people who support President Donald Trump have lower trust in societal institutions, when compared with supporters of leading Democratic candidates Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden.

Statistics Majors Outgrow National Trends

January 29, 2020
With outstanding growth in statistics majors in the past decade, UC Davis is now among the top five U.S. universities for number of undergraduate degrees granted in statistics, the American Statistical Association recently reported.

Real Memory or Alternate Reality?

January 21, 2020
Aaron French, a doctoral student in religious studies, recently wrote a piece for The Conversation about "The Mandela Effect," the collective misremembering of common events or details, and a recent movie that gave the phenomenon widespread attention. He writes here about how the effect is connected to studies, research and writing.

Taking the Temperature of Dark Matter

January 15, 2020

Warm, cold, just right? Physicists at the University of California, Davis, are taking the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe.

Pursuing Undergraduate Research Outside the Lab

January 13, 2020

Getting research experience as an undergraduate student doesn’t have to mean working in a laboratory. Instead of days spent transferring fluids from one tube to another, math major Tracy Camacho explored matroids, complex mathematical objects with many different uses. 

Who Will Kamala Harris Supporters Vote for Now?

December 20, 2019
With California Sen. Kamala Harris out of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, UC Davis communication professor Magdalena Wojcieszak and colleagues investigated who her supporters are likely to vote for.

What Gamers and Redditors Can Teach Us About Democracy

December 11, 2019
Despite the ongoing threat of misinformation spreading online, UC Davis cognitive scientist Seth Frey still believes in the promise of the internet as a force for political and economic empowerment. The National Science Foundation recently awarded Frey and colleagues at three other universities a $460,000 grant to study how groups create and enforce self-rule in a wide array of domains, including Frey’s focus: Reddit forums (called subreddits) and video games.

How Flu Vaccine Misinformation Spreads Online

December 10, 2019
Social media are a powerful tool to spread information — and misinformation — about health issues such as vaccines and cancer prevention. How does bad information spread online, and what is the best way to stop it? That is a topic being studied by Assistant Professor Jingwen Zhang and her students in the UC Davis Department of Communication.

How Groups Make Up Their Minds

December 10, 2019
The choices we make in large group settings, such as in online forums and social media, might seem fairly automatic. But our decision-making process is more complicated than we know. So, researchers at the University of Washington and UC Davis have been working to understand what’s behind that seemingly intuitive process. The research has discovered that in large groups of essentially anonymous members, people make choices based on a model of the “mind of the group” and an evolving simulation of how a choice will affect that theorized mind.

How Do You Bounce Back After a Setback?

December 10, 2019
Why are people often only fleetingly happy about positive events, but persistently upset about negative events like setbacks? Alison Ledgerwood, behavioral scientist, professor of psychology and chancellor’s fellow at UC Davis, has conducted extensive research to understand this.