Science Blog Posts

Growing a California Tea Industry

February 07, 2019
Researchers around the world are taking advantage of advances in genetic engineering, molecular biology, genomics and horticultural science to develop varieties of tea with less caffeine.

Meet Claudio Monteza-Moreno: Graduate Student Melds Biology and Anthropology

January 28, 2019
The story of how Claudio Monteza-Moreno came to UC Davis illustrates how research today often crosses boundaries — reaching across disciplines and around the globe to explore complex problems. Monteza-Moreno is a graduate student working in the lab of evolutionary anthropologist Meg Crofoot, studying how wildlife in Panama navigate landscapes transformed by humans. However, his background is in biology.

Now Fully Funded, Innovative Nuclear Monitoring Project Moving Forward

January 25, 2019
WATCHMAN, an international partnership developing new methods for monitoring nuclear reactors, is now fully funded thanks to nearly $12.8 million (£9.7 million) from the United Kingdom’s Fund for International Collaboration. The project is also sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Exploring a Strange Underwater World

December 11, 2018
Robert Zierenberg, professor emeritus in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, has studied seafloor vents since the first ones were discovered in the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1977.

Why we need #ClimateFriday

December 04, 2018
Concerned that recent climate reports might not receive the public attention they deserved, scientists began using the #ClimateFriday hashtag on Twitter to highlight findings of the reports.

Thermal Transistor Handles Heat at the Nanoscale

November 29, 2018

You’ve felt the heat before — the smartphone that warms while running a navigation app or the laptop that gets too hot for your lap.

The heat produced by electronic devices does more than annoy users. Heat-induced voids and cracking can cause chips and circuits to fail.

Schematic of the experimental thermal transistor. A slice of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sits on a piece of silicon dioxide, bathed in a solution of lithium ions. (Sood et al, Nature Communications)

Shocking Results

October 30, 2018
As a kid, planetary scientist Sarah Stewart spent her free time reading science fiction novels. Now, much like her favorite sci-fi authors, she is a world-builder — pursuing research that helps us better understand our own planet.