Department of Physics and Astronomy

UC Davis Leads $3.7M Multicampus Grant to Stem Shortage of Instrumental Physicists

There is an alarming shortfall of particle physicists prepared to design instruments that open pathways to Nobel Prize-winning discoveries like neutrino oscillations and the Higgs boson. To help fill the gap, the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded $3.7 million to a consortium led by the University of California, Davis, to train 32 graduate students in high energy physics instrumentation.

New, Third Type of Supernova Observed

An international team of astronomers has observed the first example of a new type of supernova. The discovery, confirming a prediction made four decades ago, could lead to new insights into the life and death of stars.

First Nations Rocket Team Prepares for Launch

Students from the First Nations Launch team at the University of California, Davis, will launch a rocket this Saturday, May 15 — on behalf of a team from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario. The rocket launch is part of the First Nations Launch competition sponsored by NASA and the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium at Carthage College, Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Chemistry and Physics Professors Receive NSF CAREER Awards

Two rising stars in the sciences have received prestigious CAREER awards from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) program recognizes junior faculty who conduct outstanding research, are excellent educators and include education or community outreach in their work.

Army Awards $1.5M to Study Emergent Computation

The U.S. Department of Defense's Army Research Office has awarded $1.5 million to James Crutchfield, professor of physics in the UC Davis College of Letters and Science, and his colleagues to advance our understanding of how to predict and program emergent behavior.

Simulations Reveal Signs of Galaxy Mergers in Milky Way Disk

Some of the Milky Way’s oldest stars have been spotted in a surprising place — the disk that is our galaxy’s youngest region. Supercomputer simulations of their orbits suggest these metal-poor stars came from a smaller galaxy that slammed into the Milky Way more than 7 billion years ago.